Reinventing Guest Blogging

May 12,2018 / Blog / admin

Steven, Melissa, & Alan recap their discussion with Tom Schwab, Founder of Interview Valet.

Listen to the Original Interview (54 minutes)

Read the transcript

Yeah, I’m Steven Melissa and we’re on a mission to find out how other creative hustlers fine balance while living at the intersection of creativity and business. Every week we’re interviewing global entrepreneurs and creative about their creative hostel journey team to kick ass. What’s possible or in the studio? Melissa Allen. What’s up guys? We’re upon energy tonight. Murphy just got off an airplane. No, I di, I really appreciate the fact that you just jumped off the plane like, let’s do this. I wasn’t expecting it. I almost made plants in my comfy clothes. Might be sure you’re all dressed up. Honestly. She’s business on top and the bottom a boy we are recapping, um, every time. Every time it happens. We are recapping today. Tom Schwab. Schwab. Yeah. There’s a famous famous, these famous beyond famous is financial services. The whole thing went through Charles Schwab, but no, he was very much in finance, finances and um, he was hired by Dale Carnegie to run one of these companies and Dale Carnegie hired Charles Schwab. I’m not because he was the smartest person in with money, not because of any of that. He hired him because he know how he knew how to lead and manage people and bring out enthusiasm in a team. He was, he was a hostile. He was the first person, bunch of money with the first person to have a million dollar salary. Wow. First fourth half a million dollar salary, and that’s back in the day, early 19 hundreds. Eighteen, hundreds of times related to him at all until the later. It gets that a lot.

Yeah. It’s a legacy name. Yeah. Well I get George Bush and all kinds of other people thinking I’m related to the George Bush legacy. Yeah, right. The Charles Schwab has so. Right, right. Well, Tom Schwab, ah, I love this is. This has been like a reoccurring theme for us, but this whole idea. So Tom runs a company called interview valet. You can check out interview Valet, uh, in the podcast matchmaking service. That’s really cool. It’s very similar to the job or Chinos are similar and funny. Funny and, but all roads lead back met Tom through John, like the Kevin Bacon of our basically like to decouple Bertina exactly. Ponds. And so, uh, it’s a similar model with John and what our work with the agency guy. We connect brands and

what Tom does is he connects up podcast guests to podcasts to podcasts, which is, you know, you think about it, it’s such a great medium these days. Of course, it’s one of those missing links and I think a lot of people don’t know about that. They don’t know how to get on other people’s podcasts. I know somebody and people who have been doing it for awhile, you know, so you could easily hustle your way into a podcast if you really want to on some level. But the thing is, if you don’t know what’s going on, you don’t owe us something really good to say, but you don’t know where to say it.

Exactly. The leads that you’re trying to. You’re trying to attract people that you’re trying to attract. Where are they keeps growing and growing and growing. And it’s like one of those things that if someone like interview valet you up with the right types of people, that the graphics there, you should be on shit as a creative hustler. Should be on the creative audio podcast. Right, right, right. So, so, so the whole thing was with Tom, you know, he’s all about inbound marketing and it, it’s funny because he claimed, I mean, they, he says interview Valet is an inbound marketing company, except their content is podcast. All audio, you know, it’s all audio and in a way it’s a, um, the whole booking service because there’s a lot. We realize this, we found out very thomas. He’s made, he mentioned the stat, right? It was a staggering, he said, 80 percent of podcast die within the first 10 episodes.

Dude, Melissa, I looked at each other now. And you can attest. Yeah, yeah, yes. I can understand why I’ve done several in the past. The 10 episodes. Yeah. Yeah. So I’m apologize. I’m a couple of weeks to a hundred podcast. One is over a hundred and 50 episodes due to data is actually a hundred and 30. OK. And we’re getting close to 75 of that. So the thing is like you’re creeping up, creeping up and don’t. But you think about how many people have the idea of starting a podcast and then they realize what goes into like just booking all my God getting guests and like Melissa had to figure it out like show releases and. Yeah, and timing and process process and production equipment, software. And I’m super proud of you guys for taking this journey and taking the journey with me also because like you’re learning kind of along the way, but there was like, there’s like that whole, uh, what I really admire is that how many guests you get that are really awesome guests. And this is not even, no disrespect to the interview valet, but like they’re doing it like gorky organically. Right? I can imagine what happened when you got an interview with this like crack for a podcast that is called an interview crack. OK. Podcast, crack pipe and smoke it, right? We’re going to get your shit addicted and then you’re gonna pay a lot of money and we’re going to keep going until there is no India one. Yeah.

Research that you pay somebody else to do or you take a ton of time to do it yourself. They have done all this. They vetted the podcasts. They know who the listeners are, they know who you know, what the flow of the shows are. Things like that.

Nervous. I feel like the, the creative hustler to having a little bit of an advantage because everyone here is like some kind of marketer, you know the brand, the social so we know how to understand all this. A little bit of a leg up, leg up on that and we’ve kind of come from that background but the thing is like they’re doing that. The heavy work for you and like is it not everyone can be doing podcasts that are related to marketing and entrepreneurship

but we have our, we have our assistant looking for s for Steven

but, but the bottom line is before you even had an assistant, you had lines of guests like a. That was the thing I noticed about you guys. Like immediately you’re not messing around right now. Like, like when I got semi involved. When you’re looking at do I want to do a podcast like, all right, look, I have the audio knowledge on something, figure out what you’re doing and you gotta figure out the front end. We nailed it down and they’re like, no, no, I have people lined up. We just got to figure out what the fuck would decry the fact that you guys had done that and it’s still continuing to do that. It’s really remarkable. So today I had a gal reach out to me. She runs a very similar service to interview valet. Literally this happened today via facebook because I’m a part of guys.

I’m just gonna be completely creative hostel if you do not leverage facebook groups, especially number one leverage to our group, but like other people’s groups as well. What the hell are you waiting for? Community? Yeah, definitely leverage that. I’m sorry, I’m just so excited. That’s what you’re there for. So there’s A. There’s a podcast group, group, podcast group that I belong to. If somebody puts something up, like if you’re looking for guests, what kinds of guests are you looking for? And I say we’re looking for entrepreneurs, creatives in bad asses, and literally today she goes, I got three guys I want to introduce you to. Literally today I got three people who wanted to be on the show because she’s a matchmaker and she plays that role and it was just like, I just sat there kind of like a wow, like concept for interview valet. Totally. That’s just organic because you imagine what someone who has that knowledge has stuff going on behind the scenes has years of experience doing this. Tom Does, right? Yeah. Tom, it’s got the role of. I mean he’s been in whether it’s marketing or he. He’s been around the block. I mean he’s seen the ebb and flow. Yeah. A business, a lot of people out today, even the 2008 crash or maybe you know, 15 at the time

and they don’t necessarily. I mean I was working at the time, I remember I worked in the five year financial buildings around me in Boston and all the financial people would come in. I was bartending and they would come in and a lot of them lost their jobs. A lot of woes. I saw a lot of what it was and everyone went from drinking, you know, top shelf Margarita is to like to $2 fresh entropy, bro. Here’s why. Here’s, well, here’s why it didn’t slow going. You know, the 2008 crash that Tom lived through. He was, he was, he was a middleman like matchmaker at the time. He ended up losing his job just like all those people would come to the who would come to let k legals tasks, kitchen, legal, seafood. They would come to the bar. They didn’t stop going out to eat or drink. They just didn’t spend as much what you did during that time to start a bar and a hustler bar. The creative. That’s actually not a bad idea, but. So Tom lived through this. He worked for fortune 500 companies close. He was in the military for awhile. He was a nuclear engineer. I believe engineering engineering. I’m not sure if like for what, but that was like his career. He’s just got an engineering mind. You worked there like he worked for fortune 500 companies like with this

funny engineering minds into inbound marketing and Melissa, you and even you, Alan, you guys are very analytical by nature in that way. The process, the process, inbound marketing, just like podcast marketing, exactly the same thing. Let’s just be real sure of all process driven. Absolutely. It’s all based on a formula that proven and that work kind of mold into something that’s something you know like not all podcasts are the same, so figure out what your demographics are, where are your personas are, and then you fit them into that. That’s what he’s asked. What’s cool about his business that he’s able to say, all right, well you know, are you applying for a John Lee Dumas or are you more related to these people are more social podcasts. Are you related to him or a beer-drinking podcasts, whatever it is, you can customize what it is that you’re trying to be opposed to vice versa.

If I have a list of guests to go on your podcast, it really is a. it’s beneficial on both sides. Notice on his website he had actually both of us. Yeah. I mean are you, do you want to be interviewed or. Exactly like, you know, like maybe if somebody like me I want to do both. I interview people, but I also want to get interviewed. You know who else we met through a very similar service. Michael Gibbons. Micro gaps. Yeah. He came out to us through the ballet is do another one. Um, that was out there and the whole process was so smooth and I remember thinking about a friend be like

genius and then brought that was via. That was a service. He said that was a service that he uses. They act as a Va. They act as a virtual assistant. They put a one sheet together. They do the pitch. Hey, alan inspired you to do the, the one sheet which has inspired me to do the one sheet. I put

together my own speaker one sheet and I’ve kind of crafted my own little, a guerrilla style interview valet to where, you know what I mean?

And it really like stuck out, you know, gibbs sent along his one sheet and it was like, here’s who I am, here’s what’s going on. Like iT wasn’t full of stuff. You are topics I could talk about, which I thought was really beneficial, which is huge. Actually. I was just recently on august crunch has summit that’s coming up. Right? By the way, I heard you crushed it. Real women. Don’t bet.

Yeah. I saw the uh, not to make melissa embarrassed, but I do see the, the uh, the callbacks to that and saying that you did really well and that there was like quotes from you.

Where does That come out? That comes out september 26. But what I was going to say, and now I forget what about your speaker one sheet. Didn’t have any topics about the topics, right? The topics. So sHe was only having 10 speakers august and I got a, you know, And basically what we’re talking about is our past and you know, and the whole, the whole mission behind it is what’s happened to you, does not condemn you. it actually qualifies you for the shit that has happened to you in your life, doesn’t condemn you and your self doubts and your fears and the things that had happened to you actually qualify you in this life and especially if you’ve broken through that mold and whatnot. But the topics. So I get on, I get on there with her and there’s, you know, she had me fill out the whole thing was like, what, what do you, what can you talk about what you want to talk about?

One other thing when we got on there on the, on the interview, and I was just like, ok, well what kinds of topics have you already talked? We’ve got 10 speakers, right? You want them to all talk about the same thing. What have they already talked about? You know, they’ve talked about this topic or that topic or whatever topic. And then I was like, ok, well I could talk about that. I could talk about this. And I was like, all right, well how about this? How about like a false sense of confidence? And that was my topic. Like these people who are so hard because they have to, they have to be because it’s like a survival skill. You have to be hard on the outside. And what it does is it creates this false sense of confidence. But anyway, the whole poInt of saying this is that, um, knowing your topics and knowing what you’re interviewing is can actually talk about is great because sometimes it’s like you, you know, we could talk to the same people and get the same conversation sometimes I want to know something for sure. yeah, I mean it up and they can talk about. But I want you to talk about the

beauty of it so you can, you can mix it up with. You could take the same fricking topic and talk with different people about what they’re saying and they have a one sheet about what they’re talking about. Also now it turns into a completely dIfferent concept and a different tangents and different levels of things that we like. A lot of our recaps sometimes reinforced the same motifs, but we have different conversation. Everything’s different. Yeah. It’s a little bit different. So I do like that aspect of, you know, having these one sheets and having the speaker sheet and you know, I think I think about when I was gigging musician with epc case, electronic press kit,

right? This is, this is our, here’s a photo of the band does play, these are awards your something you can listen to and it’s just, it’s a great a pr agency. Any pr agency, that’s one of the first things they’re going to say. We’re gonna work together on the pr agency created. We need to put a press kit together for you. Like how are we going to pitch you on just that media kit. It’s got, it’s kind of like a resume or cover letter like why and what’s going on. we actually built our one sheet, I saw, I actually saw like a couple other one sheet sheets come through and I was like hi. And I could, I’m just going to make one myself. So I had um, I kind of drew it out. Literally. I drew it out and I gave it over to one of our designers and he built it on canva for us because we love canva and he was like the craziest to talk to, um, to the people of our kanban.

We should reach out to canva, canva, canva, hey, can I can go, come on over and over, came back getting back to schwab and company are you go on his website and it actually, if you go to a interview valet.com/hustler a, he’s got a couple of free gifts for everyone. We’re interviewing him. He talked about, uh, how he has a checklist on what to do before, how to prepare yourself for a podcast. And this is classic. And he’s like, yo, what are the main things I tell people before the simplest thing, shut your cell phone off. I’m like, yeah, it sounds simple enough writer interview and at the end of the interview, sure enough, as fate would have it, his fucking cell phone. Sorry, you broke your rule. that’s rule number one right there. what is this awesome track? every district was at the end of the podcast for a reason because now we can go into your commercial break. Right, right, right. That’s what the checklist is for the checklist around. Like if you’re, if you’re planning on being interviewed you right, how do you prepare, you know, that’s a good point. It’s not even just about being on a podcast was being about an audible things like things that you dId for the august, technically speaking, but like breathe, jump around your blood flow

anyway. So getting back to valet [inaudible] slash hustler, there’s three free gifts on there and that’s where you were going with this. Um, learn the nine secrets to getting booked on your first podcast, podcast guests profits and get the ultimate podcast guests interview checklist. And you can download all three of those. Sure.

Yeah. So definitely check it out. And, and the great, great resources, especially the idea of like what to do before a podcast. I um, ok. So before performance, so I’ve been a musician, I, I did dinner theater for years before the dinner theater show. We had a very strict routine. We’d all get in a circle and we’d say we’d go around the circle who our character is, what our motivation is, and then we’d have a chant that we did. Our chat was a lot of people paid a lot of money to see a lot of show and don’t you forget about it seriously was our thing. But like, listen, I recently, uh, before we do a podcast, kind of look at each other, high five, have a good interview. Like, you know, there’s gotta be a ritual and I married steven wanted to keep it high five, but what it it, the hug where I’m like a game on the app out and hugged me loving this.

Me. But like before pitching on a podcast or like even august summit, like there are certain things like, do you stand up or do you sit down getting interviewed? I wAnt to stand and I want to conduct an interview standing up. But then I realized that I can’t do because I use dual monitors. One monitor’s I’d have to fucking rearrangement task. Not to do callbacks, but yeah, it was a big proponent of standing. He was like running a ranch, our interview, so I’ll just from a track right now. Awesome. Hanging out with him though. That’s one of the people. I’m like, you know what it is when you can stand up and do that. So it was like, yeah, there’s little tips like that motion creates emotion. Yeah. We used to say that I used to work a hardcore sales in a boiler room type setting. Everyone stand up. Cool. Motion creates emotion, you know, you want to move. They also say that in the movie boiler room, they say the same thinG, like get up, get the blood moving because, because, and we’ve heard this, you could be slouching on the couch

and people will hear that in your diaphragm. Sure. That in your voice. But if you’re standing up you just have that energy. The blood is flowing. You know what I uh, recently. so I have a client with another one of my project managers on my team and we kind of a it in tandem, but she’ll come into my office and do it because she’s like, my voice is a lot. I want to make sure I’m, I’m, oh, I don’t want to live around me and we talked to this guy and I get the chance to stand up and I’m like, dude, I want to have, I want to do this all the time with every single client because I get to talk to talk to you and talk to the clients. Absolutely. And I’m standing up, walking around just getting stuff, kicking whatever is in my offIce are. But while I’m talking I’m not distracted. I’m just like focused on the focus because I have a lot of energy going on there. So there is something to be said there. And what you all don’t realize is um, allen’s drywall bill at his office is through the roof.

He’s like, why are there holes?

I have a lot of energy. Take melissa’s pink ball fun. The one that we have in the closet that I took away from steven because he was kicking it all around their house somewhere or you kicked him out, kicked the fallen video going on somewhere. Hidden video, video versus one. They get some kind of prize. We’Ll figure it out. We’ll give you a mole. Skin broken, a lot of things about the lamp and a lot of things. I thought the tv was going to fall over at one point like so I took it away. You should take it for your office since we’re moving, but it’s not one of those sitting balls. You can kick it around your office. They’ll take a pink ball of fun to your office. It’s literally written on it, but that sharpie math matthew, hire someone. Then melissa drive, fuss around.

Question about do you have a pink ball of fun? Are you opposed to a pink ball? A fine. All right. You get the pink dolphins. I claim it. Came back to tom and tie this whole thing together. Um, I think, I think she mentioned podcast analytics beIng something on the future. Like better analytics from. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I totally agree with this bright light. It gotta be more than just downloads and subscribers. Yeah. His specific reference was how apple has just changed their platform and it’s coming up. Yeah. Well maybe he, that’s what he said with the new ios 11 for upper apple apple podcast. Get better analytics use anymore. It’s like apple podcast podcast on apple have been like the red headed step child in the family like doesn’t really care about politics is a huge growth in it, but yeah, you track downloads and subscribers. There’s nothing wrong with redheads. I’ve got a bunch of them. I think it’s just an expression. Changes. Just had a baby recently. Kevin fleming. Shadow. Congratulations to Kevin Fleming.

Be listening to this. Congrats right directly with kevin and laura around minute 23. Just give him the time. Just make them listen to it. Maybe made a 33 minute is another big one in the. The sales sales industry for podcasts analytics. I do agree with that because I feel like there’s not enough of backgrounds where you could actually like highlight moments of a podcast in the show notes of the creative hustle. You have timestamps and not everyone does that. Some people want to paint for literally the whole thing, but sometimes you want to fast forward to the party like or maybe you want to highlight that part is like, oh, coming up is going to some really good discussion about podcasts. Analytics. I think one of our most recent episode way, patrick stiles, he’s got vitol lytics and seeing such a parallel between video analytics and it’s the same thing.

It’s the same thing thing. BAsically it’s just patrick audio make that happen. like patrick, you have to now work on podcast analytics. He’s got the vIdeo analytics. It would be really easy to rip the a marketer know we want to know these family members have asked me like, do you know when people were coming, were there listening, how long they’ve listened for? Like all, all that kind of stuff. We get stats like that from the the podcasting thing, things we do, but like I feel like California, san diego, seven people from our apartment buildings listening to my podcast. Right, right. Which one do you like the best? Stand here until you tell me what episode number. I think that the next generation of podcasts, ah, are the next generation is going to be incorporating big data and more analytics into it so we can go ahead and make an impact from an advertising perspective because now the advertising on a podcast at all, if the seat to cpc right, the cost per click, I’m sorry, it’s a cpm cost per thousand listens.

That’s how they do it. So if you have a towel podcast that is 10,000 listens, you can figure that whole thing out, but that’s a captive it captive, but we don’t know if they’re listening to that third fucking commercials to drop off. Or are they listening to do the full thing of those early. The first week finished, we put a call to action in the beginning of that was. That was exactly why, because you can learn from that. You know it. It’s a three and a half minute intro like tim ferriss dots in first at about three and a half minutes of a commercial joe rogan. It’s like he does like 15 minutes of commercial at the beginning of. Yes you do. I totally do. Now, no offense to joe rogan charging his advertisers based on your listenership and you’re not listening. So that’s not a captive, right? That’s not a captive audience, right? He does. He does it again, going back to the podcast, but like, he, uh, he talks a little bit. Let me read some advertising. Right,

sir? I liked the way John Lee dumAs, few he doesn’t like natively like he, you know, he’ll, he’ll just go into talking and it’ll be someplace like in the beginning,

you got to do it natively. I feel it at the beginning. You’re losing your audience. I mean, we’ve, we’ve experimented and I don’t think it’s worked well with that being said, creative hustlers, but does work, are these recaps? What does work is having an amazing guests, even if it’s done on a vein, I’m pretty sure my english was wrong. What does work? What do work? What does work? What does work? What does work is right to work well for more on tom and interview valet. Um, if you’re interested in getting started with podcasting, um, do you want to get booked on podcast or if you have a podcast and you want more guests, please check out interview valet [inaudible] flash hustler download shoe ups, freebies for more on oscar depository [inaudible]. Got the creative hoffler dot if you were not part of our amazing group, which has grown, we’re actually going about to hit a milestone. Another hundred or 300. We’re going to reach soon. Where are they going? Slower group community on facebook. My facebook group, which if you just go to our page, it’s pinned at the top. You can see it. They’Re just pinned at the top. We love reviews on itunes and stitcher and google play and we are now on which we are now on play. Good. Yeah, a good one. We’re looking into iheartradio at iheart radio and some other syndication. So, uh, with that being said, [inaudible] peanut gallery, alan and melissa, you guys. Hey lisa,

for your moment of hustle, brought to you by napoleon hill. How do get dreams off the launching pad? A Burning desire to be and to do is a starting point from which the dreamer must take off. Dreams are not born of indifference, laziness or lack of ambition. Remember that all who succeed in life get off to a bad start. I’m passed through many heartbreaking struggles before they arrive. The turning point in the lives of those who succeed usually comes at the moment of some crisis through which they are introduced to their other selves.

 

Listen to the Recap (31 minutes)

Read the transcript

Yeah, I’m Steven Melissa and we’re on a mission to find out how other creative hustlers fine balance while living at the intersection of creativity and business. Every week we’re interviewing global entrepreneurs and creative about their creative hostel journey team to kick ass. What’s possible or in the studio? Melissa Allen. What’s up guys? We’re upon energy tonight. Murphy just got off an airplane. No, I di, I really appreciate the fact that you just jumped off the plane like, let’s do this. I wasn’t expecting it. I almost made plants in my comfy clothes. Might be sure you’re all dressed up. Honestly. She’s business on top and the bottom a boy we are recapping, um, every time. Every time it happens. We are recapping today. Tom Schwab. Schwab. Yeah. There’s a famous famous, these famous beyond famous is financial services. The whole thing went through Charles Schwab, but no, he was very much in finance, finances and um, he was hired by Dale Carnegie to run one of these companies and Dale Carnegie hired Charles Schwab. I’m not because he was the smartest person in with money, not because of any of that. He hired him because he know how he knew how to lead and manage people and bring out enthusiasm in a team. He was, he was a hostile. He was the first person, bunch of money with the first person to have a million dollar salary. Wow. First fourth half a million dollar salary, and that’s back in the day, early 19 hundreds. Eighteen, hundreds of times related to him at all until the later. It gets that a lot.

Yeah. It’s a legacy name. Yeah. Well I get George Bush and all kinds of other people thinking I’m related to the George Bush legacy. Yeah, right. The Charles Schwab has so. Right, right. Well, Tom Schwab, ah, I love this is. This has been like a reoccurring theme for us, but this whole idea. So Tom runs a company called interview valet. You can check out interview Valet, uh, in the podcast matchmaking service. That’s really cool. It’s very similar to the job or Chinos are similar and funny. Funny and, but all roads lead back met Tom through John, like the Kevin Bacon of our basically like to decouple Bertina exactly. Ponds. And so, uh, it’s a similar model with John and what our work with the agency guy. We connect brands and

what Tom does is he connects up podcast guests to podcasts to podcasts, which is, you know, you think about it, it’s such a great medium these days. Of course, it’s one of those missing links and I think a lot of people don’t know about that. They don’t know how to get on other people’s podcasts. I know somebody and people who have been doing it for awhile, you know, so you could easily hustle your way into a podcast if you really want to on some level. But the thing is, if you don’t know what’s going on, you don’t owe us something really good to say, but you don’t know where to say it.

Exactly. The leads that you’re trying to. You’re trying to attract people that you’re trying to attract. Where are they keeps growing and growing and growing. And it’s like one of those things that if someone like interview valet you up with the right types of people, that the graphics there, you should be on shit as a creative hustler. Should be on the creative audio podcast. Right, right, right. So, so, so the whole thing was with Tom, you know, he’s all about inbound marketing and it, it’s funny because he claimed, I mean, they, he says interview Valet is an inbound marketing company, except their content is podcast. All audio, you know, it’s all audio and in a way it’s a, um, the whole booking service because there’s a lot. We realize this, we found out very thomas. He’s made, he mentioned the stat, right? It was a staggering, he said, 80 percent of podcast die within the first 10 episodes.

Dude, Melissa, I looked at each other now. And you can attest. Yeah, yeah, yes. I can understand why I’ve done several in the past. The 10 episodes. Yeah. Yeah. So I’m apologize. I’m a couple of weeks to a hundred podcast. One is over a hundred and 50 episodes due to data is actually a hundred and 30. OK. And we’re getting close to 75 of that. So the thing is like you’re creeping up, creeping up and don’t. But you think about how many people have the idea of starting a podcast and then they realize what goes into like just booking all my God getting guests and like Melissa had to figure it out like show releases and. Yeah, and timing and process process and production equipment, software. And I’m super proud of you guys for taking this journey and taking the journey with me also because like you’re learning kind of along the way, but there was like, there’s like that whole, uh, what I really admire is that how many guests you get that are really awesome guests. And this is not even, no disrespect to the interview valet, but like they’re doing it like gorky organically. Right? I can imagine what happened when you got an interview with this like crack for a podcast that is called an interview crack. OK. Podcast, crack pipe and smoke it, right? We’re going to get your shit addicted and then you’re gonna pay a lot of money and we’re going to keep going until there is no India one. Yeah.

Research that you pay somebody else to do or you take a ton of time to do it yourself. They have done all this. They vetted the podcasts. They know who the listeners are, they know who you know, what the flow of the shows are. Things like that.

Nervous. I feel like the, the creative hustler to having a little bit of an advantage because everyone here is like some kind of marketer, you know the brand, the social so we know how to understand all this. A little bit of a leg up, leg up on that and we’ve kind of come from that background but the thing is like they’re doing that. The heavy work for you and like is it not everyone can be doing podcasts that are related to marketing and entrepreneurship

but we have our, we have our assistant looking for s for Steven

but, but the bottom line is before you even had an assistant, you had lines of guests like a. That was the thing I noticed about you guys. Like immediately you’re not messing around right now. Like, like when I got semi involved. When you’re looking at do I want to do a podcast like, all right, look, I have the audio knowledge on something, figure out what you’re doing and you gotta figure out the front end. We nailed it down and they’re like, no, no, I have people lined up. We just got to figure out what the fuck would decry the fact that you guys had done that and it’s still continuing to do that. It’s really remarkable. So today I had a gal reach out to me. She runs a very similar service to interview valet. Literally this happened today via facebook because I’m a part of guys.

I’m just gonna be completely creative hostel if you do not leverage facebook groups, especially number one leverage to our group, but like other people’s groups as well. What the hell are you waiting for? Community? Yeah, definitely leverage that. I’m sorry, I’m just so excited. That’s what you’re there for. So there’s A. There’s a podcast group, group, podcast group that I belong to. If somebody puts something up, like if you’re looking for guests, what kinds of guests are you looking for? And I say we’re looking for entrepreneurs, creatives in bad asses, and literally today she goes, I got three guys I want to introduce you to. Literally today I got three people who wanted to be on the show because she’s a matchmaker and she plays that role and it was just like, I just sat there kind of like a wow, like concept for interview valet. Totally. That’s just organic because you imagine what someone who has that knowledge has stuff going on behind the scenes has years of experience doing this. Tom Does, right? Yeah. Tom, it’s got the role of. I mean he’s been in whether it’s marketing or he. He’s been around the block. I mean he’s seen the ebb and flow. Yeah. A business, a lot of people out today, even the 2008 crash or maybe you know, 15 at the time

and they don’t necessarily. I mean I was working at the time, I remember I worked in the five year financial buildings around me in Boston and all the financial people would come in. I was bartending and they would come in and a lot of them lost their jobs. A lot of woes. I saw a lot of what it was and everyone went from drinking, you know, top shelf Margarita is to like to $2 fresh entropy, bro. Here’s why. Here’s, well, here’s why it didn’t slow going. You know, the 2008 crash that Tom lived through. He was, he was, he was a middleman like matchmaker at the time. He ended up losing his job just like all those people would come to the who would come to let k legals tasks, kitchen, legal, seafood. They would come to the bar. They didn’t stop going out to eat or drink. They just didn’t spend as much what you did during that time to start a bar and a hustler bar. The creative. That’s actually not a bad idea, but. So Tom lived through this. He worked for fortune 500 companies close. He was in the military for awhile. He was a nuclear engineer. I believe engineering engineering. I’m not sure if like for what, but that was like his career. He’s just got an engineering mind. You worked there like he worked for fortune 500 companies like with this

funny engineering minds into inbound marketing and Melissa, you and even you, Alan, you guys are very analytical by nature in that way. The process, the process, inbound marketing, just like podcast marketing, exactly the same thing. Let’s just be real sure of all process driven. Absolutely. It’s all based on a formula that proven and that work kind of mold into something that’s something you know like not all podcasts are the same, so figure out what your demographics are, where are your personas are, and then you fit them into that. That’s what he’s asked. What’s cool about his business that he’s able to say, all right, well you know, are you applying for a John Lee Dumas or are you more related to these people are more social podcasts. Are you related to him or a beer-drinking podcasts, whatever it is, you can customize what it is that you’re trying to be opposed to vice versa.

If I have a list of guests to go on your podcast, it really is a. it’s beneficial on both sides. Notice on his website he had actually both of us. Yeah. I mean are you, do you want to be interviewed or. Exactly like, you know, like maybe if somebody like me I want to do both. I interview people, but I also want to get interviewed. You know who else we met through a very similar service. Michael Gibbons. Micro gaps. Yeah. He came out to us through the ballet is do another one. Um, that was out there and the whole process was so smooth and I remember thinking about a friend be like

genius and then brought that was via. That was a service. He said that was a service that he uses. They act as a Va. They act as a virtual assistant. They put a one sheet together. They do the pitch. Hey, alan inspired you to do the, the one sheet which has inspired me to do the one sheet. I put

together my own speaker one sheet and I’ve kind of crafted my own little, a guerrilla style interview valet to where, you know what I mean?

And it really like stuck out, you know, gibbs sent along his one sheet and it was like, here’s who I am, here’s what’s going on. Like iT wasn’t full of stuff. You are topics I could talk about, which I thought was really beneficial, which is huge. Actually. I was just recently on august crunch has summit that’s coming up. Right? By the way, I heard you crushed it. Real women. Don’t bet.

Yeah. I saw the uh, not to make melissa embarrassed, but I do see the, the uh, the callbacks to that and saying that you did really well and that there was like quotes from you.

Where does That come out? That comes out september 26. But what I was going to say, and now I forget what about your speaker one sheet. Didn’t have any topics about the topics, right? The topics. So sHe was only having 10 speakers august and I got a, you know, And basically what we’re talking about is our past and you know, and the whole, the whole mission behind it is what’s happened to you, does not condemn you. it actually qualifies you for the shit that has happened to you in your life, doesn’t condemn you and your self doubts and your fears and the things that had happened to you actually qualify you in this life and especially if you’ve broken through that mold and whatnot. But the topics. So I get on, I get on there with her and there’s, you know, she had me fill out the whole thing was like, what, what do you, what can you talk about what you want to talk about?

One other thing when we got on there on the, on the interview, and I was just like, ok, well what kinds of topics have you already talked? We’ve got 10 speakers, right? You want them to all talk about the same thing. What have they already talked about? You know, they’ve talked about this topic or that topic or whatever topic. And then I was like, ok, well I could talk about that. I could talk about this. And I was like, all right, well how about this? How about like a false sense of confidence? And that was my topic. Like these people who are so hard because they have to, they have to be because it’s like a survival skill. You have to be hard on the outside. And what it does is it creates this false sense of confidence. But anyway, the whole poInt of saying this is that, um, knowing your topics and knowing what you’re interviewing is can actually talk about is great because sometimes it’s like you, you know, we could talk to the same people and get the same conversation sometimes I want to know something for sure. yeah, I mean it up and they can talk about. But I want you to talk about the

beauty of it so you can, you can mix it up with. You could take the same fricking topic and talk with different people about what they’re saying and they have a one sheet about what they’re talking about. Also now it turns into a completely dIfferent concept and a different tangents and different levels of things that we like. A lot of our recaps sometimes reinforced the same motifs, but we have different conversation. Everything’s different. Yeah. It’s a little bit different. So I do like that aspect of, you know, having these one sheets and having the speaker sheet and you know, I think I think about when I was gigging musician with epc case, electronic press kit,

right? This is, this is our, here’s a photo of the band does play, these are awards your something you can listen to and it’s just, it’s a great a pr agency. Any pr agency, that’s one of the first things they’re going to say. We’re gonna work together on the pr agency created. We need to put a press kit together for you. Like how are we going to pitch you on just that media kit. It’s got, it’s kind of like a resume or cover letter like why and what’s going on. we actually built our one sheet, I saw, I actually saw like a couple other one sheet sheets come through and I was like hi. And I could, I’m just going to make one myself. So I had um, I kind of drew it out. Literally. I drew it out and I gave it over to one of our designers and he built it on canva for us because we love canva and he was like the craziest to talk to, um, to the people of our kanban.

We should reach out to canva, canva, canva, hey, can I can go, come on over and over, came back getting back to schwab and company are you go on his website and it actually, if you go to a interview valet.com/hustler a, he’s got a couple of free gifts for everyone. We’re interviewing him. He talked about, uh, how he has a checklist on what to do before, how to prepare yourself for a podcast. And this is classic. And he’s like, yo, what are the main things I tell people before the simplest thing, shut your cell phone off. I’m like, yeah, it sounds simple enough writer interview and at the end of the interview, sure enough, as fate would have it, his fucking cell phone. Sorry, you broke your rule. that’s rule number one right there. what is this awesome track? every district was at the end of the podcast for a reason because now we can go into your commercial break. Right, right, right. That’s what the checklist is for the checklist around. Like if you’re, if you’re planning on being interviewed you right, how do you prepare, you know, that’s a good point. It’s not even just about being on a podcast was being about an audible things like things that you dId for the august, technically speaking, but like breathe, jump around your blood flow

anyway. So getting back to valet [inaudible] slash hustler, there’s three free gifts on there and that’s where you were going with this. Um, learn the nine secrets to getting booked on your first podcast, podcast guests profits and get the ultimate podcast guests interview checklist. And you can download all three of those. Sure.

Yeah. So definitely check it out. And, and the great, great resources, especially the idea of like what to do before a podcast. I um, ok. So before performance, so I’ve been a musician, I, I did dinner theater for years before the dinner theater show. We had a very strict routine. We’d all get in a circle and we’d say we’d go around the circle who our character is, what our motivation is, and then we’d have a chant that we did. Our chat was a lot of people paid a lot of money to see a lot of show and don’t you forget about it seriously was our thing. But like, listen, I recently, uh, before we do a podcast, kind of look at each other, high five, have a good interview. Like, you know, there’s gotta be a ritual and I married steven wanted to keep it high five, but what it it, the hug where I’m like a game on the app out and hugged me loving this.

Me. But like before pitching on a podcast or like even august summit, like there are certain things like, do you stand up or do you sit down getting interviewed? I wAnt to stand and I want to conduct an interview standing up. But then I realized that I can’t do because I use dual monitors. One monitor’s I’d have to fucking rearrangement task. Not to do callbacks, but yeah, it was a big proponent of standing. He was like running a ranch, our interview, so I’ll just from a track right now. Awesome. Hanging out with him though. That’s one of the people. I’m like, you know what it is when you can stand up and do that. So it was like, yeah, there’s little tips like that motion creates emotion. Yeah. We used to say that I used to work a hardcore sales in a boiler room type setting. Everyone stand up. Cool. Motion creates emotion, you know, you want to move. They also say that in the movie boiler room, they say the same thinG, like get up, get the blood moving because, because, and we’ve heard this, you could be slouching on the couch

and people will hear that in your diaphragm. Sure. That in your voice. But if you’re standing up you just have that energy. The blood is flowing. You know what I uh, recently. so I have a client with another one of my project managers on my team and we kind of a it in tandem, but she’ll come into my office and do it because she’s like, my voice is a lot. I want to make sure I’m, I’m, oh, I don’t want to live around me and we talked to this guy and I get the chance to stand up and I’m like, dude, I want to have, I want to do this all the time with every single client because I get to talk to talk to you and talk to the clients. Absolutely. And I’m standing up, walking around just getting stuff, kicking whatever is in my offIce are. But while I’m talking I’m not distracted. I’m just like focused on the focus because I have a lot of energy going on there. So there is something to be said there. And what you all don’t realize is um, allen’s drywall bill at his office is through the roof.

He’s like, why are there holes?

I have a lot of energy. Take melissa’s pink ball fun. The one that we have in the closet that I took away from steven because he was kicking it all around their house somewhere or you kicked him out, kicked the fallen video going on somewhere. Hidden video, video versus one. They get some kind of prize. We’Ll figure it out. We’ll give you a mole. Skin broken, a lot of things about the lamp and a lot of things. I thought the tv was going to fall over at one point like so I took it away. You should take it for your office since we’re moving, but it’s not one of those sitting balls. You can kick it around your office. They’ll take a pink ball of fun to your office. It’s literally written on it, but that sharpie math matthew, hire someone. Then melissa drive, fuss around.

Question about do you have a pink ball of fun? Are you opposed to a pink ball? A fine. All right. You get the pink dolphins. I claim it. Came back to tom and tie this whole thing together. Um, I think, I think she mentioned podcast analytics beIng something on the future. Like better analytics from. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I totally agree with this bright light. It gotta be more than just downloads and subscribers. Yeah. His specific reference was how apple has just changed their platform and it’s coming up. Yeah. Well maybe he, that’s what he said with the new ios 11 for upper apple apple podcast. Get better analytics use anymore. It’s like apple podcast podcast on apple have been like the red headed step child in the family like doesn’t really care about politics is a huge growth in it, but yeah, you track downloads and subscribers. There’s nothing wrong with redheads. I’ve got a bunch of them. I think it’s just an expression. Changes. Just had a baby recently. Kevin fleming. Shadow. Congratulations to Kevin Fleming.

Be listening to this. Congrats right directly with kevin and laura around minute 23. Just give him the time. Just make them listen to it. Maybe made a 33 minute is another big one in the. The sales sales industry for podcasts analytics. I do agree with that because I feel like there’s not enough of backgrounds where you could actually like highlight moments of a podcast in the show notes of the creative hustle. You have timestamps and not everyone does that. Some people want to paint for literally the whole thing, but sometimes you want to fast forward to the party like or maybe you want to highlight that part is like, oh, coming up is going to some really good discussion about podcasts. Analytics. I think one of our most recent episode way, patrick stiles, he’s got vitol lytics and seeing such a parallel between video analytics and it’s the same thing.

It’s the same thing thing. BAsically it’s just patrick audio make that happen. like patrick, you have to now work on podcast analytics. He’s got the vIdeo analytics. It would be really easy to rip the a marketer know we want to know these family members have asked me like, do you know when people were coming, were there listening, how long they’ve listened for? Like all, all that kind of stuff. We get stats like that from the the podcasting thing, things we do, but like I feel like California, san diego, seven people from our apartment buildings listening to my podcast. Right, right. Which one do you like the best? Stand here until you tell me what episode number. I think that the next generation of podcasts, ah, are the next generation is going to be incorporating big data and more analytics into it so we can go ahead and make an impact from an advertising perspective because now the advertising on a podcast at all, if the seat to cpc right, the cost per click, I’m sorry, it’s a cpm cost per thousand listens.

That’s how they do it. So if you have a towel podcast that is 10,000 listens, you can figure that whole thing out, but that’s a captive it captive, but we don’t know if they’re listening to that third fucking commercials to drop off. Or are they listening to do the full thing of those early. The first week finished, we put a call to action in the beginning of that was. That was exactly why, because you can learn from that. You know it. It’s a three and a half minute intro like tim ferriss dots in first at about three and a half minutes of a commercial joe rogan. It’s like he does like 15 minutes of commercial at the beginning of. Yes you do. I totally do. Now, no offense to joe rogan charging his advertisers based on your listenership and you’re not listening. So that’s not a captive, right? That’s not a captive audience, right? He does. He does it again, going back to the podcast, but like, he, uh, he talks a little bit. Let me read some advertising. Right,

sir? I liked the way John Lee dumAs, few he doesn’t like natively like he, you know, he’ll, he’ll just go into talking and it’ll be someplace like in the beginning,

you got to do it natively. I feel it at the beginning. You’re losing your audience. I mean, we’ve, we’ve experimented and I don’t think it’s worked well with that being said, creative hustlers, but does work, are these recaps? What does work is having an amazing guests, even if it’s done on a vein, I’m pretty sure my english was wrong. What does work? What do work? What does work? What does work? What does work is right to work well for more on tom and interview valet. Um, if you’re interested in getting started with podcasting, um, do you want to get booked on podcast or if you have a podcast and you want more guests, please check out interview valet [inaudible] flash hustler download shoe ups, freebies for more on oscar depository [inaudible]. Got the creative hoffler dot if you were not part of our amazing group, which has grown, we’re actually going about to hit a milestone. Another hundred or 300. We’re going to reach soon. Where are they going? Slower group community on facebook. My facebook group, which if you just go to our page, it’s pinned at the top. You can see it. They’Re just pinned at the top. We love reviews on itunes and stitcher and google play and we are now on which we are now on play. Good. Yeah, a good one. We’re looking into iheartradio at iheart radio and some other syndication. So, uh, with that being said, [inaudible] peanut gallery, alan and melissa, you guys. Hey lisa,

for your moment of hustle, brought to you by napoleon hill. How do get dreams off the launching pad? A Burning desire to be and to do is a starting point from which the dreamer must take off. Dreams are not born of indifference, laziness or lack of ambition. Remember that all who succeed in life get off to a bad start. I’m passed through many heartbreaking struggles before they arrive. The turning point in the lives of those who succeed usually comes at the moment of some crisis through which they are introduced to their other selves.

Do Podcast Hosts Judge You by the Company You Keep?

September 15,2017 / Blog / admin

In a recent study of over 500 top podcast hosts, we found the best way to get interviewed on a podcast was with a personal introduction. More than just name-dropping, it’s a way for a host to have a sliver of instant trust to start a conversation. Personal introductions also help hosts to get an idea of you through the people introducing you.

Podcasters judge you by your associations

This is true in other areas of life too: (more…)

Dan Miller on How Authors, Speakers, & Coaches Can Leverage Podcast Interviews

September 16,2016 / Blog / admin

 

Dan Miller: Now, a lot of you are authors, writers, speakers, coaches, and you ask questions about how you can really leverage your message, how you can spread that message. Tom Schwab is a dear friend of mine. He’s in my mastermind. We share a lot of ideas together. He has a company called Interview Valet where he books people on podcasts to help them get exposure for their message. To people like Aaron Walker who last year was on 176 podcasts, that absolutely exploded his business. I wanted Tom to come on. I wanted to interview him. Now, there’s a reason for that. For one thing, he’s breaking a record in doing interviews himself, which is really cool. He’s going to set a Guinness world record for number of interviews done. I wanted to help him contribute to that, but I really wanted to pick his brain about how podcasts are so powerful about helping to spread our message. Here’s my short note or short interview discussion with Tom. Tom, I’ve talked to people that you not only are a business colleague of mind, but a personal friend, so it’s a delight to have you on the call today.

 

Tom Schwab : Dan, I am thrilled to be here. The only way it could be better is if we were sitting beside each other there in the Sanctuary in Franklin, Tennessee.

 

Dan Miller: Well, come on down. The weather’s great. The fans are going. We could sit out on a patio here and have a conversation, but we’ll make do with Skype in the meantime. Tom, I’ve told people that you, with Interview Valet, help people, authors, speakers, coaches get exposure for what they do by being podcasts guest. It’s really a popular concept, but explain to us how this shift is taking place, how radio is changing, and what’s happening with podcasting.

 

Tom Schwab : Dan, I think we’ve seen it over the years, and it really is the empowering of people to choose what they want. It’s not what radio station we can get anymore, but what content we want to listen to, and the Internet makes that possible. I think it’s funny sometimes calling it “podcast,” because there are people that have never owned an iPod or wouldn’t know what an iPod is but know what a podcast is. Really, it’s almost on demand radio now. You can get it downloaded to the dashboard of new cars. You can get it to your phone. You can do so many things while you’re doing it, and I think it’s one of the magic parts about it is that it’s the only medium where you can multitask.

 

I can’t read your blog while I’m jogging, but I can listen to the podcast. I can’t watch a video while I’m cooking dinner, but I can sure listen to a podcast, and so really, it gives the power to the listener, and I think we’ve just seen it explode here. There’s 350,000 podcasts in the US right now, and while that sounds like a lot, they’re all niched down, so you can find just the interests you want and it’s no longer that people are just listening to it because it’s the only thing on. No, now they’re listening to it because they want to listen to it, and they want to listen at the time they want.

 

Dan Miller: You know, I love it. Of course I used to listen to radio, as lots of people did, but now even when I jump in my car, my car has Bluetooth so it automatically picks up from my phone the podcast that I was listening to that morning and just continues. Even those 10, 15 minutes in my car, I’m listening to podcasts, and radio is pretty well in the background for me. One of the things that I know you really help people with is recognizing that podcast interviews, you’re in essence borrowing the credibility in the audience of other people who already have established audiences, and that may be easier for some people than getting a speaking about where they would walk up on a stage. How do you help people understand the ease of being a podcast guest?

 

Tom Schwab : Very much so, Dan. To build up your own audience can take time, and that’s why a lot of people would guest blog or try to get on a story on the Huffington Post or one of the bigger ones, but when it comes to podcasting, I’ve talked to clients before and said, “Would you stop everything you’re doing right now and drive across town to talk to 10 ideal customers?” “Oh, sure.” I’m like, “Would you get in a car and drive across state to talk to 100?” They’re like, “Sure.” Then you say, “Would you get in a plane to talk to 1,000?” At this point, they’re like, “I’m not sure I’m comfortable talking in front of 100, much less 1,000,” and I’m like, “Well don’t worry. You don’t have to go any place. You can do it as a podcast guest, so you already know who the [inaudible 00:04:31] is. They’ve already got the trust of the host who’s invited you on there, so you’re sharing that trust, and now you get to talk to them.” It can be intimidating for some people talking in front of a large audience, but heck, this is just two guys talking here. You’re hearing the same thing that if Dan and I were sitting out on the porch, and it’s very comfortable. Everybody can talk on a telephone, and if you’re comfortable talking on a telephone, you should be comfortable talking on a podcast.

 

Dan Miller: I love the way you laid that out, because I’m talking with you. I’m not thinking about who else is listening. It’s two guys sitting out here on the bench, under the patio, having a conversation. Podcasting allows us to do that. If somebody is an author, somebody is more introverted than being a real extrovert but they have a message they want to share with people, you help them understand podcasting is a gentle, a nonintrusive, nonthreatening way to help spread their message, which we have to do. Talk a little bit about the fact that you can have a great message, but in today’s world, unless you have some way to spread that message, it’s not going to affect a lot of people.

 

Tom Schwab : Very much so. There’s great tools out there, but that gives everybody the same opportunity, and sometimes it gets to be a noisier and noisier world. For a while, they were talking about, how do you break through the noise? It really struck me when we were out at Social Media Marketing World. I saw everybody walking around with headphones on. The gentleman that was sitting next to me on the plane, there was no breaking through the noise with him. He had headphones on. He could’ve been an ideal customer, but I couldn’t have gotten to him. People on the bus, all the rest of that, whereas if you know who you want to talk to, they’re already listening there. One of the great rules about marketing is, start the conversation where it’s already going on. If they’re already listening to something, they know, like, and trust it, that’s the place to start that discussion. One of the analogies that I use is if you want to talk to people, there’s two ways to do it. Go to the party where they’re already at, and start in the discussion, or sit at home and hopefully they come by your house. One of them is going to be a whole lot easier, a whole lot more fun, a whole lot less costly and get you faster returns, and that’s going to where they’re already listening.

 

Dan Miller: Absolutely. Great visual picture for that. When somebody has a message, people often ask me if they are beginning authors or speakers, “Should I do an ebook? Should I do a physical book? Should I create a little course? Should I create a live event?” I tell them, “Yes, yes, yes, yes.” Make it easy for your audience to participate in the message that you want to share with them. Talk just a little bit about how you see people repurposing interviews. They do an interview with somebody. How can that content be shared or perhaps even broken into other ways to communicate with people?

 

Tom Schwab : That’s such a marvelous question, Dan, because you’re so right because you put out so many different forms, and there’s certain people that love to read your blog. There’s other people that love the podcast, and there’s certain times where you’re more comfortable producing one form of content than the other. For example, I’m an engineer. My training was as an engineer, and it’s caused the way I think. I don’t naturally just write. Writing a blog for me is painful, but speaking is so much easier. If you can naturally speak, you can transcribe any podcast interviews, and there’s a great service out there called Rev.com. For a dollar a minute, you can have it transcribed and sent right to your email. Often, on these podcasts, we’ll go ahead and transcribe them, and now you’ve got this great content. We all talk at about 150 words a minute. That means about every four minutes, you’ve got another blog there. There are people that wouldn’t read a dozen blogs of yours each week, but they’ll listen to a 48 minute podcast. People can take these interviews, transcribe them, make blog posts into them.

 

We’ll even take them and then start going with highlighters and find 140 characters of wisdom. It’s like, “There’s a great quote.” “Hey, here’s another great piece that would be great for a meme.” There are some people that’ll even put B-roll footage behind it and make little videos out of it. Really, the problem now is not how to create the content. It’s just, do it whichever way works best for you and then repurpose it in what works best for your audience.

 

Dan Miller: Yeah. Boy, great examples in there. There’s so many ways people can take their message and make sure that it’s being heard by people. Tom, I know that you’re serious about doing these interviews. You have a personal goal to set a record for interviews completed, I understand.

 

Tom Schwab : I do. I looked on the Guinness Book of World’s Records, and there was a record for the most interviewed person on television, for the most interviewed person on radio, but there was not one for podcasting, and I love being a podcast guest. The people I get to talk to, the people I get to meet, so I reached out to the people at Guinness Book of World’s Records and said, “Had you ever thought of this as a category?” They were like, “That would be great,” so I’m trying to get as many interviews as I can before January 1st of 2017, and with that, they’ll be looking at my data and should be awarding it at that time. I’ll put 48 Days and Dan Miller toward the top of that list.

 

Dan Miller: That’s great. Boy, that’s a short time frame. You’re really going to get in the game here to make that happen. That’s awesome.

 

Tom Schwab : I’ve been doing interviews for two years, so I’ve got hundreds and hundreds of interviews, but really cranking it up this last part of the year.

 

Dan Miller: That’s great. Tell people how they can get in touch with you, Tom, learn more about what you do business-wise, as well as just continue to get these tips about doing great interviews.

 

Tom Schwab : I love connecting with people. That’s one of the great things. What’s ordinary to you is amazing to me. If I can be of any service, just go to InterviewValet.com/48Days. I’ll have all my contact information there, my social media. We’ll have some free offers there talking to you about the six secrets to getting booked on a podcast. There’s a little training video that shows you how you can use this to grow your business, how to turn listeners into leads. I think marketing, that it’s hard. It’s starting a conversation with somebody. If you’re listening to Dan on this podcast, you know the power of podcasting. I guess the only question really is, in the future are your customers going to hear you or your competitor? There’s two ways to do that. Either start your own podcast, or be a guest on great podcasts.

 

Dan Miller: Wow. Well put. Tom, thanks for your time, your expertise, sharing so willingly here. Our audience is going to benefit from you having been on. Thanks so much.

 

Tom Schwab : Thank you, Dan.

 

Dan Miller: All right, well there you go. Again, my friend Tom Schwab. If you want to get his tips about how to do interviews well, he’s got some unique content created for us, the 48 Days audience. Just go to InterviewValet.com/48Days.

 

5 Website Trust Seals Vital to Podcast Guests

March 03,2016 / Blog / admin

If you want to super charge your marketing, there is no better way today than to talk directly to your ideal customers as a podcast guest. Marketing at its heart is starting the conversation with somebody that could be an ideal customer, and being on a podcast, being interviewed as an expert sets you up to talk to thousands or tens of thousands of people that can be ideal customers. The host often gives you softball questions. They prop you up as an expert. They want to make you look good, so they look good to their audience.

The host wants to help you, but you still need to do work on your part to make sure that when listeners come to your website, that it continues to build trust.  Success doesn’t come from just being on a podcast. Success comes consistently from the system you have in place to take people from being listeners, to visitors, to leads. Your website is a pivotal piece of the machine.  It will either build trust and move people along in the process, or it will kill the process right there.

We’ve learned many things from e-commerce about conversion rates that apply to being a podcast guest.


 

Here are five vital aspects that podcast guests can add to their websites to help listeners become leads.

Your Picture

It’s natural to want to know what someone looks like after you hear them.  If listeners arrive at the website to find no picture of the person, you have missed an opportunity to build the relationship.  Don’t use canned stock images of all the beautiful people smiling for no reason. They are fake. They’re not authentic. They destroy trust and confidence. You want to make sure that there is a professional image of yourself that’s consistent with your other branding.

About Us Page

Website analytics tells us the ‘about us’ page is often one of the most visited page on any website.  Studies show a high percentage of customers visited this page before completing a purchase.   Often it’s the same information on the one-page pitch sheet you gave the podcast host to get booked initially.

The ‘about us’ page is not about you.  Rather it tells the visitor what you can do for them. Failure to have an about us page can communicate that you are more focused on the transaction than the long term relationship.

Social Media

It’s 2016; people expect others to be on social media.  Especially if you are an expert they heard online.  Ensure your website has social media icons that link back to your profiles.  You don’t need to be every social media. If your customers aren’t on a platform, neither should you.

For anyone focused on the business-to-business market or offering a professional service /product, you’ll be expected to have a basic LinkedIn profile. Make sure that with one click from your website, visitors can find you elsewhere online. On Linkedin, they can read your entire resume.  They can see to whom you are connected and who you follow. They can quickly validate what they heard on the podcast is consistent with what they find online.

The Footer

Scroll to the bottom of any web page. Here you will find a major pass/fail litmus test on trust. Is the date of the copyright current? If not it’s a warning sign that the site is not up to date either. The other trust seal people look for is the physical address, or, at least, a P. O. Box, city and state. Visitors want to know you are real. They want to know who they’re dealing with, where they are. When you don’t have a location, people may assume the worst: you could be a foreign scam.

Customer Testimonials

When podcast listeners visit your website, do they see customer testimonials?  We all say great things about ourselves, but what do our customers say? A site that doesn’t include testimonials can be a trust killer.

Visitors realize that we post our best customers testimonials. What does it say if none exist?  New visitors want to see and hear from somebody that looks like them; that has a company, or business, or life like them. They want to be able to relate to an individual that has said good things about your product or service. If you can get a picture of that person along with their name, and their company, along with some place that the visitor could click to and realize, “Yes, this is a real person,” you will see your conversion rates sky-rocket!

Ezra Firestone talked about this fact in e-commerce conversions. Having an image of a person’s face and a testimonial near any call to action helps people get over the fear of clicking. It can even lessen the fear of buyer’s remorse.


We don’t work with companies; we work with people. We choose to work with people we know, like, and trust. We only buy from people we trust.

If people aren’t engaging with you on your website, it’s often not because of your product. They haven’t even experienced the product. The roadblock is that they don’t trust you enough to give you their email address. They don’t trust you enough to put in their credit card.

As a podcast guest, you’ve already talked to them for 30 to 45 minutes Once they arrive at your website let’s make sure you do everything possible to move that relationship along.  These five trust factors can further build rapport to show visitors that you are the expert that can solve their problem. You can make their life better, and all they have to do is take this next step.